Emotional and Behavioral Challenges After Stroke

Emotional Challenges Image

After a stroke, people often experience emotional and behavioral changes. This is because stroke affects the brain, and our brain controls our behavior and emotions. Injury from a stroke may make a person forgetful, careless, irritable or confused. Stroke survivors may also feel anxiety, anger or depression.

Many disabilities resulting from stroke improve with time. Behavior changes and emotional health can also improve over time.

Conditions Impacting Emotions Image Conditions Impacting Emotions & Behavior
Learn more about depression, reflex crying (psuedobulbar effect), one-side neglect, memory challenges and other conditions that may affect a stroke survivor's mood or behavior after stroke.

Maximizing Emotional/Behavioral Recovery & Independence
Find tips and advice for improving and managing the conditions that may affect mood and behavior after stroke such as enhancing self-esteem and memory.

Personal Stories
Read stories of stroke survivors sharing their challenges and accomplishments related to emotional/behavioral changes after their strokes.

Sex After Stroke
Sex can be a sensitive subject, but the good news is that many stroke survivors and their partners can enjoy satisfying intimacy after stroke.

Especially for Caregivers Especially for Caregivers Image
Information specifically for stroke family caregivers to help them cope with emotional/behavioral changes that may affect their loved ones after stroke.

Additional Resources
Helpful links to other organizations with useful information

To request an information packet about stroke, visit our stroke information request.

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In our current issue: Grieving the Old Self, Embracing the New; Understanding Common Post-Stroke Medications; What to Expect in Stroke Rehab; Finding Joy as a Caregiver and much more!

 

Find Support

Find a Support Group

Seeking support from others who've experienced stroke can be a huge benefit to recovery. Stroke groups afford the opportunity to share feelings, ideas and resources.  Find a group in your area.

Seeking support from others who've experienced stroke can be a huge benefit to recovery. Stroke groups afford the opportunity to share feelings, ideas and resources.  Find a group in your area.

If there is not a support group in your area, or if getting to one is just to difficult, connecting with others online is a great option.

Although everyone at the ASA's national call center is qualified to answer questions about stroke, the Warmline team members have some particularly special experience; either they are stroke survivors themselves or have a family member who is.

Call 1-888-4-STROKE
(1-888-478-7653) to reach the Warmline Team